Steve’s Christmas Reading List

Every Christmas I have a reading list made up of books piled up on my night stand, books I rush out to buy for the holidays and those I receive. Inevitably there are some that get benched for that mythical beach vacation we always talk about.

If I had to pick a few here’s what I’d read (or re-read):

The Road – Cormac McCarthy
This book, by the same author as No Country For Old Men, is one of my all time favourites. For all you dads out there, this is a brilliantly written father-son story (which are rare to begin with, and so infrequently tried). If your kids have outgrown Finding Nemo, this post-apocalytic story might be a little dark to read together, but it’s one that they will appreciate when they hit high school. This book is a must read by all dads, and should be part of any new dad’s utility belt.

Omnivores Dilemma – Michael Pollan
If you are rethinking where your food comes from and are trying to decide whether to buy the organic breakfast cereal or the free range chicken, this book might be for you. A great first read for people looking to determine if they need to change the way they source, buy and eat their food.

Free: The Future of a Radical Price – Chris Anderson
I always like reading books about rethinking the way we do things and the way our economy is defined. Besides, isn’t free good?

The company – Robert Littell

Every dad likes spy novels. This book is a biography of the CIA. Ever since I read Confessions of an Economic Hitman, I’ve been wanting to pick this one up.

Predictably Irrational – Dan Ariely
I am a sucker for books that explain the quirky nature of human behaviour. A few Christmases ago, I screamed through Freakonomics (note: this one gets an honorable mention!).

PMP Exam Prep: Rapid Learning to Pass PMI’s PMP Exam-On your first try – Rita Mulcahy
Ok, so I’m prepping for my PMP certification, so by no means is this my unwind and relax book, but its actually a well written prep book, with exercises properly designed to help retain knowledge. Stay tuned to see if I pass. Rita’s book (the author’s material is so helpful in getting people certified, people refer to her in by first name!) is one of two books considered go-to material.

So all I need to do is find time between Christmas, the move and the renovations to get to all these books. Maybe I should renew my subscription to Audible.

2 comments

  1. I really liked Freakonomics too, but the problem with this type of book is excess of anecdotes. It makes for interesting reading but not good science. Freakonomics was better than most books since it recognized this and even asks the “what came first” or “which is the cause and which is the effect” question in several chapters (but leaves it to the reader to decide).

    My favourite stat was that your kid is more likely to be injured in the school parking lot by another parent than by lightening strike or abduction! I.e.: your better off letting your kid walk to school with an umbrella during a thunderstorm than driving him there and dropping him off!

  2. I really liked Freakonomics too, but the problem with this type of book is excess of anecdotes. It makes for interesting reading but not good science. Freakonomics was better than most books since it recognized this and even asks the “what came first” or “which is the cause and which is the effect” question in several chapters (but leaves it to the reader to decide).

    My favourite stat was that your kid is more likely to be injured in the school parking lot by another parent than by lightening strike or abduction! I.e.: your better off letting your kid walk to school with an umbrella during a thunderstorm than driving him there and dropping him off!